RIOTS-20 Hillsborough County – Rebuild Community-Based Businesses Grant Program

 

BE ON THE LOOKOUT

Broken.  Burned. Vandalized. Looted.

 Repair. Rebuild. Restock. Reopen.

Businesses that may be on the verge of thinking about recovering from months of executive-ordered shutdowns resulting from the global pandemic are now being victimized by domestic “civil unrest”.  Early estimates say 50-60 Hillsborough County businesses have been impacted.

The Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners unanimously approved $3,000,000 in financial relief for businesses victimized by civil unrest (riots) on or after May 30, 2020. Reimbursement grants for expenditures above and beyond insurance proceeds will be awarded in amounts up to $50,000.

Eligible applicants are privately-held small businesses and non-profits with less than 25 full-time employees prior to May 29, 2020.  Sole proprietorships are eligible as well. Eligibility requirements incudes having been in operation prior to January 1, 2020 and have no outstanding debts to the county.   Eligible expenses are replacement of inventory, signage, equipment, furniture, and fixtures as well as physical repairs and painting.

Required documentation will more than likely consist of proof of being a Hillsborough County Business, police report(s), insurance claim(s), and receipts/invoices.

 We strongly encourage small businesses of other cities and counties to call or go online to see if a similar program is available.  We also encourage you to follow your city or town and county on social media for Civil Unrest developments. 

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COVID-19 Employer Payroll Tax Deferral UPDATED

Updated 06/05/2020   SBA PPP Loan Forgiveness recipients, upon Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act becoming law, can now defer the employer share of Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes incurred through the end of the year.  Previously, SBA PPP Loan recipients could only defer amounts incurred until the PPP loan was forgiven.

“Section 2302 of the CARES Act provides that the payment and deposit of the employer’s share of the social security portion of FICA tax and the employer’s share of the social security portion of RRTA tax for deposits that are due to be made during the period beginning on March 27, 2020, and ending before January 1, 2021, is not due before December 31, 2021 (for the first 50 percent of the liability), and December 31, 2022 (for the remaining 50 percent of the liability).”

Blahblahblah! What this means. NONE of the matching 6.2% for Social Security/FICA and (RRTA) that employers would normally deposit/pay between March 27 and December 31, 2020 has to be deposited/paid in 2020.  It does have to be deposited/paid eventually.  Self-employed folks can defer 50% of their 12.4% social security tax ONLY, NOT 50% of “self-employment tax” which includes the 2.9% Medicare portion.  And you don’t have to be impacted by COVID-19.

The 6.2% amount not paid becomes, in essence, an interest free loan with these repayment terms:  50% must be paid/deposited by December 31, 2021 and the remaining 50% paid/deposited by December 31, 2022.  The employer still has to timely pay/deposit the matching Medicare 1.45% along with the Social Security, Medicare and federal income tax withheld from employees.

Eligible with SBA PPP – Yes. If you were one of the lucky ones to have gotten an SBA PPP loan – congratulations.  You can also take advantage of the employer payroll tax deferral for additional cash flow maximization – even after your lender tells you the PPP loan is forgiven.  At that point, you will NO LONGER become ineligible for further employer payroll tax deferral.  Keep in mind, that in the case of the PPP loan not being forgiven, it becomes a loan with these repayment terms: Due in 5-years, 1% interest rate, no prepayment fees, no prepayment penalties.

Eligible with SBA EIDL – Yes.

Eligible with SBA PPP Loan Forgiveness – Yes.

Eligible with Paid Sick/Family Leave Credit/FFCRA credits – Yes.

Eligible with Employee Retention Credit – Yes.

We recommend each pay period that you record the unpaid/undeposited amount as a debit to expense and a credit to long-term liability.  If a third-party agent, such as ourselves, or a PEO prepares your payroll and payroll reports and prepares or submits tax deposits on your behalf, IMMEDIATELY get a hold of them and let them know whether or not you want defer the employer payroll tax.  Conversely, IMMEDIATELY get a hold of them should you wish to discontinue the employer payroll tax deferral.

If you need to cancel a previously scheduled EFTPS payment, call 800.555.4477.  EFTPS can cancel and reschedule payments.  All you have to do is suffer through high call volume and an unusually long wait time and then provide your name and Tax ID number, the exact amount of the payment, and the date of the payment.

We have noted no revision to the EFTPS website regarding the Employer Payroll Tax Deferral.  Include ONLY the employees’ withheld 6.2% on the social security line.

The Form 941 for 2020, Employer’s QUARTERLY Federal Tax Return was revised April 29, 2020 to accommodate payroll tax relief provided by congressional legislation in response to COVID-19.  Enter employee withheld 6.2% on line 13a and the deferred 6.2% on line 13b.

It will be important to maintain a system of periodic reconciliation of Form 941, line 13b totals to the balance sheet long-term liability account.

We are here to guide you through this process and anything else to help you get through COVID-19.  Email info@accpas.com.  Please put COVID-19 in the subject line.  Or call us at 727-327-1999. 

In addition to the monthly newsletter and weekly blog we will be sending COVID-19 updates through “Email Updates”. 

Follow McAtee & Associates on your preferred social media for additional COVID-19 updates.  We are on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+. 

Stay safe. Stay strong!

COVID-19 Disclaimer.  Laws and regulations have quickly changed and will continue to change in order to mitigate the economic damage caused by the Coronavirus Crisis.  New laws and regulations are being passed quicker than the legislative process has taken in the past. Guidance, clarifications, and interpretations are constantly evolving.  Deadlines and due dates are being extended and re-extended. New relief and programs are constantly rising up.  This is occurring on all levels:  Federal, State, and Local.  Information we publish may not be updated after initial publication/dissemination. We are committed to giving you the best answer possible based on what we know at the time your question is asked.

 

 

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COVID-19 Congress Makes PPP Loan Forgiveness A Bit Easier!

Last week, on May 27, 2020 the House passed legislation, Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act, H.R. 7010, loosening the requirements for PPP loan forgivenessYesterday, the Senate, while not in full session, unanimously consented to the House version of the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act.  Basically, Congress made the CARES Act, a short-term fix a longer-term solution. This legislative loosening of burdensome and complex compliance greatly reduces the emotional and financial stresses of business owners allowing them to do what they do best, growing our economy.

What the bill does.

Extends the 8-week covered (spending) period to 24-weeks or December 31 whichever comes first;

Lowers the 75% floor for eligible payroll costs to 60% and increases the 25% ceiling for eligible non payroll costs to 40%;

Extends the deadline to recall and hire workers at normal wages from June 30 to December 31;

Extends the two-year repayment term to five;

Provides that borrowers who obtain SBA PPP loan forgiveness can also defer payment of employer payroll taxes (Social Security and Medicare);

Clarifies that a borrower doesn’t have to start repaying a loan until the SBA determines whether it can be forgiven; and,

Adds two new exceptions to loan forgiveness reduction: 1. Inability to find qualified employees to attain pre-pandemic workforce level and 2. Inability to get back to pre-pandemic conditions (at February 15, 2020) due to COVID-19 operating restrictions/compliance with public health and safety standards such as phased in re-openings and restructuring due to social distancing guidelines.  We cannot overemphasize the importance of documentation.

Where we are at now. 

The House language indicates that if borrowers do not meet the 60% payroll expenditure requirement, 0% of the loan will be forgiven.  A co-sponsor has stated that this was not the intent.  Last week Senate Small Business Chairman, Marco Rubio stated his concern that the House passed legislation would “create new and serious burdens for PPP borrowers in terms of forgiveness.”  We can expect technical corrections to remedy this “cliff effect”.

Despite bipartisan disdain the legislation DID NOT overturn the non-deductibility of expenses funded with forgiven loan proceeds. So, IRS Notice 2020-32, Payment Of Expenses That Result In PPP Loan Forgiveness Are Not Deductible.  Seriously, what were they thinking.  This was an opportune time to alleviate a critical concern.

The rule changes are of great benefit across the board.  In our opinion, first and foremost, this provides a solid scenario for business to resume budgeting and forecasting and it immediately enables improved cash flow and payables management.  Pushing out the repayment terms will help those businesses who may not immediately see adverse effects or who are unable to “get back on their feet” within two years.

IOO, extending the rehire date to December 31 now enables employers to recall and hire workers proportionately to geographic reopening phases and as their own business returns to normalcy whether that normalcy be the old or new.  It increases the probability that employees brought back to work stay at work at normal rates of pay.  It provides businesses with more flexible spending especially those with high per square foot rent costs especially now that social distancing will decrease per square foot revenues.  It may even help businesses struggling with commercial rent payments and who have not benefited from eviction moratoriums.  This is a huge boost for those businesses not yet reopening or barely reopening:  gyms, caterers, museums, entertainment complexes, and bars.

Since the legislation was designed to merely enhance existing legislation it does not help businesses with large inventories or high overhead expenses such as insurance.

We anticipate there will soon be clarification that June 30, 2020 remains the deadline for PPP loan application and that in no way was the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act, a reauthorization of the PPP program through December 31, 2020.

COVID-19 Disclaimer.  Laws and regulations have quickly changed and will continue to change in order to mitigate the economic damage caused by the Coronavirus Crisis.  New laws and regulations are being passed quicker than the legislative process has taken in the past. Guidance, clarifications, and interpretations are constantly evolving.  Deadlines and due dates are being extended and re-extended. New relief and programs are constantly rising up.  This is occurring on all levels:  Federal, State, and Local.  Information we publish may not be updated after initial publication/dissemination. We are committed to giving you the best answer possible based on what we know at the time your question is asked.

 

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COVID-19 SBA PPP Legislative Update

Changing the PPP rules would be of great benefit across the board. Congress’ CARES Act was based on a two-month period. Congress did not anticipate or plan for many of the glitches and questions things that have unfolded since initial passage.

Last week, on May 27, 2020 the House passed legislation, Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act, H.R. 7010, loosening the requirements for PPP loan forgiveness.

The House bill:

Extended the 8-week spending period to 24-weeks or December 31 whichever comes first;

Lowered the 75% floor for eligible payroll costs to 60%;

Extended the two-year repayment term to five;

Extended the deadline to rehire workers from June 30 to December 31; and,

Provided that borrowers who obtained SBA PPP loan forgiveness can also defer payment of payroll taxes.

The House bill clarifies that a borrower doesn’t have to start repaying a loan until the SBA determines whether it can be forgiven.  But it appears also to do away with proportional and partial loan forgiveness.

The Senate attempted a bill the week before the House passed H.R. 7010.  But requiring a vote by the full Senate caused it to fall flat.   That bill called for the 8 weeks to be 16 weeks and left the 75% at 75%.  That 75% is very much favored by Treasury. With the face of Treasury, Secretary Steven Mnuchin, saying Congress’ intent was to get money to employees and that 25% for other expenses was very fair and that those people who want to use more money for overhead can go out and borrow an EIDL. What an understanding guy.  The Senate bill provided for spending on personal protective equipment and certain reopening expenses as allowable and forgivable non payroll costs.

Changing the rules would be of great benefit across the board.  Congress’ CARES Act was based on a two-month period.  Congress did not anticipate extended stay-at-home orders.  Congress did not anticipate partial, phased-in openings.  Congress did not plan for lack of uniformity across state lines, much less across county lines and city lines.  Loans are disbursed and sitting in accounts – but businesses are not open or businesses are open 25 or 50%.  Makes it challenging to pay eight weeks of payroll in eight weeks. And not all small businesses are labor driven, perhaps they are supplies or materials or occupancy costs driven.  And there are the businesses who were closed that need inventory to reopen in order to bring back employees.

Where we are at now.  The Senate, meaning its Majority Leader, wants to fast track the House’s bill by making no changes and using unanimous consent.  This would be simple and expedient as The House has decided to stay at home until June 30 and “follow public health guidelines”.  Unanimous consent is ALL senators present agreeing YES OR NO to H.R. 7010 without objection. There is no vote.  This could very well be a possibility as the PPP and helping America’s Small Businesses is something that should be bipartisan and noncontroversial.   But, getting 100 people to agree on anything doesn’t happen very often.

On that note, let’s keep an eye on the Senate Small Business Chairman, Marco Rubio who last week stated his concern that the House passed legislation, Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act, H.R. 7010, “could create an unintended disincentive to rehiring and create new and serious burdens for PPP borrowers in terms of forgiveness.”  The disincentive referred to is the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation that provides the $15/hour “living wage” for up to 39 weeks.  The new serious burden is House language took away partial forgiveness making the 75-25 outcome all or nothing.  Rubio’s first move has been to ask Treasury if they could fix this during implementation.  This would make for fast law but ultimately gives Treasury legislative and judicial power and oversight over their own rules.

The other thing to we need to keep watching out for is whether expenses paid for with PPP funds will remain nondeductible.

PPP Update.  As of 5 p.m. ET last Wednesday, the SBA had approved about 4.4 million PPP loans totaling more than $510.5 billion with an average loan size of $114,000.  More than $135 billion in PPP funds remained available for additional lending as of last Wednesday.  More than 707,000 EIDLs have been made, totaling $55.7 billion.  In a statement earlier today, Senator Marco Rubio said 336,000 Florida businesses received 30 billion dollars in PPP loans.

McAtee and Associates’ Disclaimer:  Our blog is intended for educational and awareness purposes.  The general information provided about taxes, accounting, and business-related topics is by no means intended to provide or constitute professional advice.  Reading our blog does not create a Client/CPA relationship between you and us.  The blog, including all contents posted by the author(s) as well as comments posted by visitors, should not be used as a substitute for professional advice or as a substitute for communicating with a competent, human professional.

Our blog posts are written using current information and current or proposed rules and regulations.  Information becomes old and outdated. Rules and regulations are frequently changed, added, amended, and/or left to expire.  This is extremely true with most things tax and to a lesser and slower extent, most things accounting.  We usually do not go back and update posted blogs.  Always check with your CPA or accountant regarding not only rules and regulations but available options and how it all applies to your fact pattern and you.

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The Disaster Preparedness Sales Tax Holiday is currently underway!

May 29 – June 4, these qualifying items will be exempt from sales tax:

  • Any reusable ice pack selling for $10 or less.
  • Any portable self-powered light source selling for $20 or less: Candles, flashlights, lanterns.
  • Any gas or diesel fuel tank selling for $25 or less: Includes LP (propane) gas and kerosene containers.
  • Packages of batteries including rechargeable, selling for $30 or less: AA & AAA, C & D, 6-volt & 9-volt Not included: automobile and boat batteries.
  • Any nonelectric food storage cooler or ice chest selling for $30 or less.
  • Any portable generator used to provide light or communications or preserve food in the event of a power outage selling for $750 or less.
  • Fun stuff under $50. Bungee cords, tie down kits, and ground anchor systems.  Visqueen, plastic sheeting, plastic drop cloths, and other flexible waterproof sheeting. Tarps and ratchet straps.  Radios: two-way radios and weather-band powered by battery, solar, or hand-crank.

Mail Order and Layaway Sales may qualify for sales tax exemption.  Rain checks can be used during the sales tax holiday.  Shipping and handling charges are typically part of the sales price of an item.

Exchanging a Purchase After the Sales Tax Holiday Expires June 4, 2020.  If exchanged for the same item (different color, size), no tax due.  If you get a store credit and get something different, sales tax is due.

Keep in mind no sales tax holiday for renting or repairing the qualifying items listed above.  And no sales tax holiday for buying any of the above items at a theme park, entertainment complex, public lodging establishment, or airport.

And none of these items can be paid for with SBA PPP funds, Holiday or not!

McAtee and Associates’ Disclaimer:  Our blog is intended for educational and awareness purposes.  The general information provided about taxes, accounting, and business-related topics is by no means intended to provide or constitute professional advice.  Reading our blog does not create a Client/CPA relationship between you and us.  The blog, including all contents posted by the author(s) as well as comments posted by visitors, should not be used as a substitute for professional advice or as a substitute for communicating with a competent, human professional.

Our blog posts are written using current information and current or proposed rules and regulations.  Information becomes old and outdated. Rules and regulations are frequently changed, added, amended, and/or left to expire.  This is extremely true with most things tax and to a lesser and slower extent, most things accounting.  We usually do not go back and update posted blogs.  Always check with your CPA or accountant regarding not only rules and regulations but available options and how it all applies to your fact pattern and you.

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COVID-19 Why Hasn’t My Friend Gotten Their Stimulus Check?

On April 16, 2020 we published The Corona Virus Version of Where’s My Refund which highlighted Just Asking for A Friend.  Today we publish Why Hasn’t My Friend Gotten Their Stimulus Check?   In case your friend is wondering where the Economic Impact Payment is.

IYMI – Visit our archives.  #COVID-19 The Corona Virus Version Of Where’s My Refund

The IRS has sent out over 140M Economic Impact Payments (EIP) totaling about 239B$ and leaving about 10M payments yet to be delivered.

First, a few important things for all of us.

Remember, the Economic Impact Payment (stimulus check) is actually 2020 totally free money that most eligible people are getting now.  Because the IRS needed something to go on when this whole thing started, they used 2019 and 2018 returns as a mechanism to get payments to people.

Direct Deposit.  If you have an allocated direct deposit – the EIP will be deposited in the first account listed.  It will not be allocated.  If your tax return refunds for 2018 or 2019 were not direct deposited, the EIP will not be either. It will be mailed to the address on the last (2018/2019) tax return processed.

If a direct deposit account is closed, the bank will return the payment to the IRS, who will then mail a check or a prepaid debit card.  Find out more about that here:   EIP Card

EIPs will not be deposited into accounts that were used for Electronic Funds Withdrawal, Direct Pay, or EFTPS.  Direct Deposit info in Refund section ONLY.

The Letter.  If you have received your EIP, expect to receive snail mail in your curbside inbox within 15 days.  This letter will explain the EIP to you and offers up a phone number in case you have questions.  Yes; you read right!  A phone number.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, or LinkedIn, you already know that the IRS has hired 3,500 phone operators.  After you suffer through the long and tedious automated message there will finally be a human at the end.

Worst case scenario.  Getting the EIP amount when the 2020 tax return is filed and processed.

If your friend hasn’t gotten their Economic Impact Payment yet.

Very first thing, tell your friend – Don’t assume that it is coming just because you know you always direct deposit IRS tax refunds or have always had Social Security and VA checks direct deposited.  Go to Get My Payment on the IRS website to be sure the direct deposit information is solid.

Next, give your friend a head’s up. The IRS is going to go to 2019 processed returns first. Keep in mind that an e-filed 2019 return is not a processed 2019 return. That Form 9325 acknowledgement means only that your tax return is in the IRS curbside mailbox and not in the building yet much less on anyone’s desk or laptop.  There may be a time delay as the IRS processes the 2019 return.  And another time delay if they have to pull out your friend’s 2018 processed return.

Did your friend use a tax prep service? And maybe got one of those debit or gift cards from the tax prep service.  If your friend used a tax prep service and got a “Refund Anticipation Loan” (RAL) that would slow down the EIP’s arrival as the payment will go to the tax prep service and perhaps even back to the IRS who will then mail a check.  The IRS does not have your friend’s direct deposit information.  This still may be fixable on Get My Payment.

Did your friend provide direct deposit information for 2018 and 2019 returns?  Adding the direct deposit information on Get My Payment may still help.  If not, your friend will get a check or prepaid debit card eventually.

Did your friend file a tax return for 2018 or 2019?  It’s possible your friend might not have filed because they didn’t have quite enough income.  This may still be fixable on the IRS Website: Non-filers: Enter Payment Info Here.  If not, your friend will get a check or prepaid debit card eventually.

Did your friend make too much money?  If you’re single, married, or head-of-household filer with a respective AGI between $75,000 and $99,000; $150,000 and $198,000; and between $112,500 and $136,500 the EIP will dwindle from the maximum of $1,200 to $0.

Did your friend paper file?  The IRS is not processing paper returns.  Your friend will get a check or prepaid debit card eventually.

Is your friend up to date on bank loans?  Unless your state expressly bans it – banks and collection agencies can hijack stimulus checks.

Does your friend have a social security number?  A valid social security number for work is required.  Do both spouses have social security numbers? In a married filing joint situation both spouses must have SSNs.

If your friend didn’t get the amount expected?

How old are your friend’s child(ren)? On the tax return the IRS is using, kids must be under 17 and eligible for the Child Tax Credit.  This is an additional payment of up to $500 per child.

If your friend’s dependents are parents or relatives.  Tell your friend no $500 for parents and no $500 for relatives older than 17.  Plus, the parents and the relatives over 17 don’t get their own up to $1,200 because they are a dependent on your friend’s return.

If there are any new additions in 2020. If your friend had, adopted, or fostered an eligible child in 2020 the additional $500 amount can be claimed on the 2020 return.

If your friend is a full-time college student.

It’s a tough predicament when college students are adults and parents claim them as dependents for various tax benefits.  No one gets the benefit of stimulus – now.  If your friend cannot be claimed and is not claimed as a dependent on the parents’ upcoming 2020 return your friend may get the $1,200 credit on the 2020 return.

Stay tuned next for what to do if you receive an EIP and shouldn’t’ve.

COVID-19 Disclaimer.  Laws and regulations have quickly changed and will continue to change in order to mitigate the economic damage caused by the Coronavirus Crisis.  New laws and regulations are being passed quicker than the legislative process has taken in the past. Guidance, clarifications, and interpretations are constantly evolving.  Deadlines and due dates are being extended and re-extended. New relief and programs are constantly rising up.  This is occurring on all levels:  Federal, State, and Local.  Information we publish may not be updated after initial publication/dissemination. We are committed to giving you the best answer possible based on what we know at the time your question is asked.

 

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#COVID-19 Still Some PPP Left

Word on the street is there remains $70 billion in SBA PPP funding. That first 349B$ April 3 was gone in a matter of several days. Near the end of April, it was replenished with 310B$. Plus, all the returns-the deadline to return PPP money without penalty was May 18.

We suggest try again – it wouldn’t hurt. Reach out to your lender and inquire or get on line and try.  Maybe you might open a new account at a community bank, or a credit union, or a community development bank.  Or even an alternative to all traditional lenders: #COVID-19 Finance + Technology = Fintech

And if we can be of any assistance – just reach out.

COVID-19 Disclaimer. Laws and regulations have quickly changed and will continue to change in order to mitigate the economic damage caused by the Coronavirus Crisis. New laws and regulations are being passed quicker than the legislative process has taken in the past. Guidance, clarifications, and interpretations are constantly evolving. Deadlines and due dates are being extended and re-extended. New relief and programs are constantly rising up. This is occurring on all levels: Federal, State, and Local. Information we publish may not be updated after initial publication/dissemination. We are committed to giving you the best answer possible based on what we know at the time your question is asked.

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#COVID-19 Watts Up Miles Down.

Kids schooling at home; grownups working from home. And nowhere really to go, Watts are up and Miles are down.Electric Bills.
The big utility companies are giving a little back on May bills. No disconnecting for nonpayment. No late payment or bounced payment fees. Fees are also being waived for credit and debit card payments. If you have already gotten your bill – you may have noticed it’s a little smaller.

Duke Customers: Residential – 21% in May; Business 20-45% in May.
FPL Customers: Residential – 25% May; Business –significant one-time decrease May.
Gulf Power Customers: Residential – 40% May; Business – 40-55% May.
TECO Customers: Residential – approx. $90 through December 2020; Business – 20% monthly June through August.
Each utility also has a donation mechanism to help others in our communities.

Vehicle Insurance.
$1,427 is the 2020 average annual car insurance premium. Personal auto travel has dropped more than 50% since March due to stay at home orders and the increase in remote workers. These insurers have announced COVID-19 credits and refunds:

Allstate, American Family Insurance (That’s The General!); Chubb Auto Insurance, Farmers Insurance (21st Century Insurance), Geico, Hanover Insurance Group, Liberty Mutual, Metlife, National General, Nationwide, Progressive Insurance, State Farm, The Hartford, Travelers, USAA.

Most are offering 15 or 20% on April and May premiums. If your insurer is not on this list, give them a call and demand some cash back. If you have already gotten your premium invoice – you may have noticed it’s a little smaller. If you have already paid your premium check for the credit on the next premium bill.

COVID-19 Disclaimer. Laws and regulations have quickly changed and will continue to change in order to mitigate the economic damage caused by the Coronavirus Crisis. New laws and regulations are being passed quicker than the legislative process has taken in the past. Guidance, clarifications, and interpretations are constantly evolving. Deadlines and due dates are being extended and re-extended. New relief and programs are constantly rising up. This is occurring on all levels: Federal, State, and Local. Information we publish may not be updated after initial publication/dissemination. We are committed to giving you the best answer possible based on what we know at the time your question is asked.

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#COVID-19 Pinellas Arts Community Relief Fund

The Pinellas Arts Community Fund is OPEN AGAIN !

This is a rolling application process with review, selection and disbursement happening bi-weekly.

The Pinellas Arts Community Relief Fund was started by a collaboration between Pinellas Community Foundation, St Petersburg Arts Alliance, and Creative Pinellas. Private donations are contributing to its continuance.

The cash awards are up to $500 for individuals and between $500 and $1,500 for arts businesses and organizations.

Who is eligible?

• Professional artists are those working in visual arts including, painting, sculpture, murals, photography, etc.; performing arts including theatre, music and dance etc.; literary arts; performance, multimedia, and social justice art; and who are making a significant portion of their income through production/performance/sale of their artwork.

• Arts organizations are 501(c)(3) organizations with the primary mission of providing arts and or cultural experiences to the public.

• Small creative businesses are retail businesses run by artists or in support of artists (such as galleries, art curators/installers, etc.) whose primary source of income is arts related, and whose primary business focus is business-to-consumer or direct/artistic services to artists or arts organizations.

These unrestricted cash awards are intended to support artists, arts organizations and creative businesses with (but not limited to):

Lost wages and earnings;
Loss from event, performance, and conference cancellations and school / community-based education closures; or from expected commissions, sales, or other opportunities due to the emergency situation/related economic downturn;
Medical expenses;
Bridge support to unemployment, food stamps; and,
Rent and mortgage payments, food, utilities, and other living expenses.
Find out More AND Apply Here https://pinellascf.org/grants/arts-relief

We strongly encourage small businesses and residents of other cities and towns to see if a similar program is available. Also, if you have applied to anything keep checking the websites – grants may become refunded and new grants may pop up.

We are here to guide you through this process and anything else to help you get through COVID-19. Email info@accpas.com. Please put COVID-19 in the subject line. Or call us at 727-327-1999.
In addition to the monthly newsletter and weekly blog we will be sending COVID-19 updates through “Email Updates”.
Follow McAtee & Associates on your preferred social media for additional COVID-19 updates. We are on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.

Stay safe. Stay strong.

COVID-19 DISCLAIMER: Laws and regulations have quickly changed and will continue to change in order to mitigate the economic damage caused by the Coronavirus Crisis. New laws and regulations are being passed quicker than the legislative process has taken in the past. And the interpretations are changing daily, if not hourly. Deadlines and due dates are being extended and re-extended. Information we publish may not be updated after initial publication/dissemination. Please keep this in mind as we get through this together.

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#COVID-19 City of Clearwater – Clearwater Back-to-Business Grant and Professional Services Program (Back To Business Program)

REGISTER TO APPLY AND PREQUALIFY BEFORE MIDNIGHT SUNDAY 5/17/2020

The Back To Business Program is a Clearwater, FL program that is providing up to $6,000 for qualifying brick and mortar businesses AND up to $3,000 for qualifying home-based businesses. There is presently $4 million dollars in the program.

On May 18, the City will randomly select applicants from the pool of prequalified applicants. Those selected will then submit a complete application – at this point – the funds become first-come, first-serve.

Eligible BRICK & MORTAR Applicants

a. $3,000 “quick pay” grant to be used for business expenses including, but not limited to commercial rent or mortgage and/or utilities, vendor payments, employee wages, other;
b. Access to and payment of certain Professional Services. Services will be procured by and through contractual relationship with non-profit organization(s). Services will be funded in an amount not to exceed $1,000 per qualifying applicant; AND,
c. 2,000 grant upon completion of Professional Services obligations.

Eligible HOME-BASED Applicants

a. Access to and payment of certain Professional Services. Services will be procured by and through contractual relationship with non-profit organization(s). Services will be funded in an amount not to exceed $1,000 per qualifying applicant; AND,
b. Grant equal to 1 month’s revenue, not to exceed $2,000, as evidence by appropriate financial records.

Find Out More AND Prequalify Here

https://www.myclearwater.com/government/city-departments/economic-development/covid-19-back-to-business-program-2591#utm_source=timesdigital&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=2020

We strongly encourage small businesses and residents of other cities and towns to see if a similar program is available. Also, if you have applied to anything keep checking the websites – grants may become refunded and new grants may pop up.

We are here to guide you through this process and anything else to help you get through COVID-19. Email info@accpas.com. Please put COVID-19 in the subject line. Or call us at 727-327-1999.
In addition to the monthly newsletter and weekly blog we will be sending COVID-19 updates through “Email Updates”.
Follow McAtee & Associates on your preferred social media for additional COVID-19 updates. We are on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.

Stay safe. Stay strong.

COVID-19 DISCLAIMER:  Laws and regulations have quickly changed and will continue to change in order to mitigate the economic damage caused by the Coronavirus Crisis. New laws and regulations are being passed quicker than the legislative process has taken in the past. And the interpretations are changing daily, if not hourly. Deadlines and due dates are being extended and re-extended. Information we publish may not be updated after initial publication/dissemination. Please keep this in mind as we get through this together.

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